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Nelson A. Rockefeller papers

Date: 1908-1980

Bulk: 1958-1977

Extent: 1968 cubic feet, 528 reels of microfilm

Access: Open for scholarly access, with select material restricted, as noted.

Language of Materials: English

Arrangement:

Consists of the following OPEN collections:

Nelson A. Rockefeller Personal papers

  • A. Activities
  • B. AIA-IBEC
  • C. Art
  • E. Countries
  • G. DNA
  • H. Family and Friends
  • I. Oral Histories
  • J. Politics
  • K. Possessions
  • L. Projects
  • M. Speeches, Post-Vice Presidential
  • O. Washington, DC
  • P. Ann C. Whitman, Politics
  • Q. Hugh Morrow Interviews
  • R. Films

Nelson A. Rockefeller Gubernatorial records

  • 2. Appointments
  • 3. Assembly and Senate Memos
  • 4. Joseph H. Boyd Files
  • 7. James Cannon Files
  • 8. Affirmative Action Files (N. Lee Cook)
  • 10. Counsel
  • 12. New York State Committee to Reelect the President
  • 13. Jerry A. Danzig Files
  • 14. Executive Chamber
  • 16. 55th Street
  • 17. Issue Books
  • 19. Arthur Massolo papers
  • 22. New York Office
  • 23. Civil Service Resolutions (Charles H. Palmer)
  • 24. Political Files
  • 25. Press Office
  • 27. Public Relations
  • 28. Departmental reports
  • 29. William J. Ronan
  • 33. Speeches, Gubernatorial
  • 34. Diane Van Wie papers
  • 35. Ann C. Whitman, Gubernatorial
  • 36. Gene Wyckoff papers
  • 37. Office Records (Microfilm)
  • 38. New York State Republican Fundraising reports

Albany Scrapbooks

Nelson A. Rockefeller vice president papers

  • 2. Richard Allison
  • 3. Central Files
  • 9. National Commission on Water Quality
  • 10. New York Office
  • 12. Joseph E. Persico Files
  • 13. Press Releases
  • 15. Speeches, Vice Presidential
  • 18. Working Papers of the Vice President
  • 19. Foreign Affairs and National Security
Maps and Flat Files
Memorabilia
Photographs

Biographical Sketch:

Nelson A. Rockefeller (1908-1979) was a businessman, politician, statesman, art collector, and philanthropist. A grandson of the founder of the Standard Oil Company and son of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, he expanded the family's tradition of public life from business and philanthropy into government service and politics.

A biographical chronology of Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller's life
Nelson A. Rockefeller: A Centennial Celebration in 100 Photographs, July 8, 1908 - July 8, 2008

Nelson A. Rockefeller Personal papers

Date: 1930-1980

Extent: 661 cubic feet

Access: Material in the Rockefeller family collections which provides the names, correspondence, or activities of living members of the Rockefeller family, and/or documents the net worth of any Rockefeller family members, is restricted from scholarly access.

  • Series A: Activities, 1930-1979, 71 cu. ft. (FA338)
  • Series B: AIA-IBEC, 1945-1971, 17.6 cu. ft. (FA339)
  • Series C: Art, 1931-1979, 98.5 cu. ft. (FA340)
  • Series E: Countries, 1931-1972, 31.7 cu. ft. (FA341)
  • Series G: DNA, 1958-1968, 13.6 cu. ft. (FA342)
  • Series H: Family and Friends, 1908-1973, 57.6 cu. ft. (FA343)
  • Series I: Oral Histories, 1952-1978, 2.7 cu. ft. (FA344)
  • Series J: Politics
    • Subseries J.1: New York City Office, 1935-1976, 41 cu. ft. (FA345)
    • Subseries J.2: George L. Hinman, 1959-1970, 43 cu. ft. (FA346)
    • Subseries J.3: Oscar M. Ruebhausen, 1967-1970, 3.5 cu. ft. (FA347)
  • Series K: Possessions, 1917-1976, 8.4 cu. ft. (FA011)
  • Series L: Projects, 1932-1971, 121.5 cu. ft. (FA348)
  • Series M: Speeches, post-Vice Presidential, 1977-1979, 1.75 cu. ft. (FA349)
  • Series O: Washington, DC, 1940-1970, 136 cu. ft. (FA350)
  • Series P: Ann C. Whitman, Politics, 1958-1973, 11 cu. ft. (FA351)
  • Series Q: Hugh Morrow Interviews, 1977-1980, 2.2 cu. ft. (FA352)
  • Series R: Films (FA755)
  • Maps and Flat Files (FA437)

Series A: Activities, 1930-1979, 71 cu. ft. (FA338)

Arrangement: This series is arranged alphabetically by broad subject categories.

Scope: The series provides a partial view of Rockefeller's business, civic, governmental, philanthropic, cultural, and social activities. The series includes Rockefeller's speeches and statements, appointment books recording his daily professional activities, itineraries of his domestic and foreign travels, philanthropic and political contributions, and preparations for social events he hosted. Files on his interest in Latin America include those on the American-Colombian Corporation; Compania Anonima Hotelera Venezolana; Compania de Fomento Venezolana; Creole Petroleum; Hemisphere Films; Speeches and Statements (especially for 1940-1945); and Trips. Of particular interest are the notes, drafts and reference files assembled for his unpublished manuscript "The U.S. and the World" (1949-1950). The manuscript represents Rockefeller's summation of his role in Latin America and his ideas for future American foreign economic policy. Included are transcripts of Rockefeller's tape-recorded narration of his experiences as Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs and as president of the International Basic Economy Corporation. Other significant files include the Mayor's Business Advisory Committee (New York City); the Government Affairs Foundation; the Temporary State Commission on the Constitutional Convention (New York); the Rockefeller Brothers Fund and its Special Studies Project, directed by Henry Kissinger (1956-1967); and the Saudi Arabian-American Corporation (SARABAM, 1977).

Series B: AIA-IBEC, 1945-1971, 17.6 cu. ft. (FA339)

Scope: The American International Association for Economic and Social Development (AIA) and the International Basic Economy Corporation (IBEC) were established by Rockefeller in 1946 and 1947, respectively, as privately financed international development agencies. AIA was a philanthropy and was most active in the field of rural rehabilitation and agricultural development. IBEC acted as a for-profit business and focused on developing the "basic economies" of underdeveloped countries and thus encouraged others in those countries to establish competitive businesses. By 1971 IBEC had established over 200 businesses in 33 countries. AIA and IBEC were most active in Brazil and Venezuela.

Series C: Art, 1931-1979, 98.5 cu. ft. (FA340)

Arrangement: Organized in 6 subseries:

  1. Works of Art
  2. NAR Art Files
  3. CKU Reference Files
  4. Collection Inventories
  5. Printed Material
  6. Cancelled Art

Access: In addition to the RAC policy that material pertaining to living members of the Rockefeller family is closed, any documentation regarding distribution of art within the Rockefeller family is closed, first for the lifetime of the donor, and secondly, for the lifetime of the individual involved.

Scope: The files in this series were created in the course of acquiring, managing and disposing of pieces in Nelson A. Rockefeller's extensive art collection. For the most part these are the files of Carol Kinzel Uht who served as Rockefeller's full time curator from December 1949 until her death in 1978. Cynthia Bronson Altman joined the staff in 1971, serving as assistant curator and later as associate curator. Kendall P. Lutkins was responsible for the decorative arts portion of the art collection, including the Chinese pottery and porcelain. After Mrs. Uht's death, Mrs. Lutkins and Mrs. Altman assumed most of Mrs. Uht's responsibilities and were also responsible for the dissemination of Rockefeller's art collection in accordance with his will. The documentation begins with some of Rockefeller's earliest purchases in 1931 and ends with his death in January 1979.

Subseries 1: Works of Art, 1931-1946, 0.4 cubic feet.
This subseries documents the origin of NAR's collection. It contains correspondence with art dealers regarding works of art offered for sale; correspondence regarding loans of works owned by Rockefeller to museums and galleries, and correspondence with artists.

Subseries 2: NAR Art Files, 1949-1979, 17.6 cu. ft.
Works of art documented within this series were in Rockefeller's collection at the time of his death in January 1979. Files pertaining to works of art that were no longer in the collection were transferred to the canceled art files (Subseries 6). This subseries consists of an alphabetical file and a numeric file. Both document the acquisition, provenance, condition, cataloging, placement, and conservation of works of art. The alphabetical file primarily concerns pieces of modern art with documentation for each piece filed under the artist's name. The alphabetical file also contains correspondence with dealers, conservators, galleries, museums, and other institutions regarding the acquisition, care, and loan of works of art. The numeric file is an arrangement created by Mrs. Uht to categorize non-modern art. Works of art were designated by geographic region and arranged by accession number thereunder. The index for this file is in Appendix A of the finding aid. The NAR Art files were periodically sent to the Rockefeller family archives and were maintained there for several years. During that period some documents that do not necessarily belong in these files were interfiled here.

Subseries 3: CKU Reference Files, 1949-1979, 27.6 cu. ft.
This is an alphabetically arranged subject file maintained by Carol Kinzel Uht (CKU). It documents broad issues concerning the management of the collection which are not necessarily associated with one particular piece of art. It includes correspondence with galleries, auction houses, dealers, and museums regarding art work being lent, bought or sold. There is also internal correspondence and memoranda regarding the placement and maintenance of works of art owned by other members of the Rockefeller Family.

Included in this subseries are files on art works belonging to Rockefeller that were damaged or destroyed in the March 1961 fire at the Executive Mansion in Albany (filed under "Albany"). Rockefeller's support of museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Primitive Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art are also documented here. There are also files on the exhibition of portions of his collection at MoMA in 1969.

Subseries 4: Collection Inventories.
These photo albums were used in conjunction with the other art files to keep track of the art collection. The inventory was begun after Rockefeller left the Vice Presidency in January 1977. Most of the items documented in these inventories were from Rockefeller's primitive art collection which was used to establish the Museum of Primitive Art, and later became part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Each photo is labeled with information concerning the work, and its location. Five of the volumes (204-208) appear to be inventories of objects at Monte Sacro, Rockefeller's house in Venezuela. There are three bound volumes titled "Canceled Art," which are inventories of works which were no longer part of the collection (see Subseries 6). Also within this subseries are sixteen binders of photocopies of catalog cards on which the Museum of Primitive Art recorded information regarding individual works of art given to it by Rockefeller. These indicate the origin of the item and other pertinent information regarding the work that the museum found necessary to have. The registers were made during the late 1970s as part of a large photo inventory project of the Governor's art.

Subseries 5: Printed Material, 1935-1978, 17 cu. ft.
The exhibit catalogs are primarily from the Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Primitive Art, both of which Rockefeller was closely associated with. Mrs. Uht also tried to keep a copy of everything that was published regarding works owned by Rockefeller, particularly exhibit catalogs that included items borrowed from his collection. There is also about one cubic foot of miscellaneous art books, some in languages other than English.
There are eight volumes of Library Catalogs, which primarily record the location of each of Rockefeller's many art books. The last two volumes record the location of etchings and drawings owned by Rockefeller.
Finally, there are 23 volumes of appraisals of portions of Rockefeller's collections conducted annually from 1962 to 1976. This was done by the Fine Arts Valuation Service, headed by Gustave Gilbert. The works included in each volume are arranged alphabetically by artist, and thereunder by title. A catalog number is included as well as the value of the work. Some notations were made showing that an item was going to leave the collection (pledged) or had already left the collection (canceled).

Subseries 6: Canceled Art Files, 1949-1979, 8 cu. ft.
When Rockefeller parted with a piece of art, through gift or sale, the piece was recorded as "canceled" and the records concerning it were moved to the Canceled Art File. The file usually notes the name of the individual or institution each work went to, as well as the price for those works which were sold. This subseries also includes a photo file of canceled modern and post-modern works.

Series E: Countries, 1931-1972, 31.7 cu. ft. (FA341)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by country.

Scope: Contains Rockefeller's general correspondence with foreign nationals. Over half is with Latin Americans, including businessmen, political leaders, diplomats, artists and associates. The series includes reports on foreign institutions and countries in which Rockefeller took an interest.With some exceptions, this material consists mainly of financial appeals from individuals and institutions. Appeals from individuals include requests for money for such things as starting a business, traveling to the United States, or publishing a book. The range of institutions includes churches, universities, health centers, and businesses. Because Rockefeller followed his family's philanthropic tradition of aiding people through institutions rather than individually, nearly all of the personal appeals were declined. Only those institutional appeals that fell within Rockefeller's areas of interest were favorably answered. Most of the declination letters were written by members of Rockefeller's staff on his behalf.

Series G: DNA, 1958-1968, 13.6 cu. ft. (FA342)

Arrangement: Organized in 3 subseries:

  1. Notebooks
  2. Files for the 1968 campaign
  3. Files for Other Campaigns and Issues

Scope: Contains the records of DNA, a research group for Nelson A. Rockefeller that drafted position papers and wrote research reports on issues important to his pursuit of the Republican presidential nomination. The group had two divisions: the Domestic Party staff, headed by Roswell B. Perkins, and the Foreign Policy staff, led by Henry Kissinger. In later years, DNA was headed by Oscar M. Ruebhausen. The acronym DNA may have stood for Definitive News Analysis, but this has not been corroborated by the written record.

Subseries 1, Notebooks, 3.2 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of position papers, press releases, memoranda, and correspondence on foreign and domestic policy issues during the 1968 presidential campaign. It also contains a body of opposition research on Richard Nixon and candidate positions for the other candidates, including Hubert Humphrey, Ronald Reagan, and Robert Kennedy.

Subseries 2, Files for the 1968 Campaign, 5.6 cu. ft.
This material contains the supplementary documentation for the notebooks in Subseries 1. Also noteworthy are fact sheet files for states visited by Governor Rockefeller. The majority of the material is correspondence and chronological files created during the running of the national campaign. Also here are the organizational files for the DNA group.

Subseries 3, Files for Other Campaigns and Issues, 3.6 cu. ft.
This subseries is a conglomerate of files created during Rockefeller's other campaigns, including his run for the governorship in 1958 and the early plans for a presidential candidacy in 1960. Also included are files pertaining to New York State and city politics, including an examination of the 1961 New York City mayoral campaign.

Series H: Family and Friends, 1908-1973, 57.6 cu. ft. (FA343)

Arrangement: The series begins with files on Nelson Rockefeller's friends, arranged alphabetically by last name, and continues with his files on family members, arranged by generation.

Scope: This series contains the personal and office files of Nelson A. Rockefeller specifically related to his family members and friends, dating from Rockefeller's birth in 1908 and continuing through 1973.

Usually, the files contain correspondence with or about these individuals, but also included are newspaper clippings, publications, reports, inventories, notebooks, diaries, and photographs (transferred to the photo collection). There are also a number of folders of early materials on Nelson Rockefeller himself, which were most likely kept by his mother and then passed along to him at various times. These range from height charts from his infancy, to school work and bank statements from his adolescence, to clippings on his engagement in 1929. Also among this material are numerous photographs taken by Rockefeller, who in his adolescence had a passion for photography.

Numerous sections of this series contain materials of special significance for research on Nelson Rockefeller, the Rockefeller family, and others. Among correspondents of note are Sherman Adams, Thomas Braden, Ralph Bunche, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Wallace K. Harrison, William and Oveta Hobby, General George C. Marshall, Roberto Montenegro, Eleanor Roosevelt, Edward Stettinius, Henry A. Wallace, and Earl Warren. The correspondence between Nelson and John D. Rockefeller, Jr., is substantial (1917-1960). In contrast, the series holds only a handful of letters from John D. Rockefeller, Sr. Several female family members are well documented in this series. Foremost, Rockefeller's close relationship with his mother is evident in their letters (1917-1941). Aunts on both the Aldrich and Rockefeller sides of the family are represented here, as is Martha Baird Rockefeller, his stepmother. Also, correspondence from Mary Todhunter Clark (whom Rockefeller married in 1930) begins in 1926, and among other things, provides insight into his years at Dartmouth College. Lastly, following her passing in 2015, 18 boxes of correspondence and clippings on Margaretta (Happy) Fitler (whom Rockefeller married in 1963) were opened to research. These files (1963-1972) document her philanthropic, social, and political activities during his second, third, and fourth terms as governor of New York, as well as her involvement in Rockefeller's campaigns for the Republican presidential nomination in 1964 and 1968.

Series I: Oral Histories, 1952-1978, 2.7 cu. ft. (FA344)

Scope: This series consists of transcripts of three oral histories with Nelson A. Rockefeller. Two of the interviews were conducted by the Columbia University Oral History Research Office. Transcripts of these interviews are also housed at Columbia University. There are no tape recordings for any of these interviews at the Rockefeller Archive Center.

The first oral history, "The Reminiscences of Nelson Rockefeller," is a composite of several interviews conducted between September 1951 and January 1952 by Wendell Link of the Columbia University Oral History Research Office. Primary subjects covered include Rockefeller's tenure as Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, Latin America, the formation of the United Nations, and international affairs. The file includes five copies of the final version of the transcript, Link's original typescript with penciled edits, and a copy with Rockefeller associate Martha Dalrymple's comments on the transcript.

The second oral history was conducted on August 16, 1967, by John Luter as part of the Columbia University Oral History Research Office's Eisenhower Administration Project. Topics include Rockefeller as Chairman of the President's Advisory Committee on Government Reorganization; Rockefeller as Undersecretary of Health, Education, and Welfare; Rockefeller as Special Assistant to the President; the Four Powers Summit in Geneva in 1955; and the "Compact of Fifth Avenue" and Rockefeller's relations with Richard Nixon.

The third interview was conducted privately by Irwin Gellman on August 11 and 12, 1976, while he was gathering material for the book "Good Neighbor Diplomacy" (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979). Topics include Rockefeller's work as Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs and as Assistant Secretary of State for American Republic Affairs.

Series J: Politics

  • Subseries J.1: New York City Office, 1935-1976, 41 cu. ft. (FA345)
  • Subseries J.2: George L. Hinman, 1959-1970, 43 cu. ft. (FA346)
  • Subseries J.3: Oscar M. Ruebhausen, 1967-1970, 3.5 cu. ft. (FA347)

Scope: Contains material pertaining to Rockefeller's long career as a politician, statesman, and public servant. Much of the material is related to his tenure as governor of New York.

Subseries J.1: New York City Office, 1935-1976, 41 cu. ft. (FA345)

This subseries is arranged in 6 sub-subseries:

Sub-subseries 1, Politics, General, 1935-1970
Offers partial documentation of NAR's evolution as a political force in New York and the nation.

Sub-subseries 2, National Political Campaigns, 1956-1968
Offers limited perspective on the dynamics of NAR's three presidential campaigns (1960, 1964, and 1968) and documents his involvement in President Eisenhower's 1956 campaign.

Sub-subseries 3, New York State Gubernatorial Campaigns, 1958-1970
Partial documentation of NAR's four gubernatorial campaigns (1958, 1962, 1966, and 1970). Most of the material pertains to the 1958 campaign.

Sub-subseries 4, Polls, 1958-1970
A selection of polls and public opinion surveys conducted primarily in New York at NAR's request. Some polls are accompanied by analysis.

Sub-subseries 5, Office of the Governor, 1958-1970
Subject files primarily covering the first two administrations (1959-1966). Few files offer complete documentation of a particular issue.

Sub-subseries 6, State Issue Files, 1973-1975
This sub-subseries consists of topical records on state issues that document Rockefeller's speeches and public activities from early 1973 through 1975, including his support of other Republicans, particularly during the 1974 congressional campaign. The state files are arranged alphabetically and contain memoranda on issues and politics for all fifty states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico. Some states are more fully represented than others, particularly those which Rockefeller visited. For such states, these files contain the background binders prepared for speeches he gave on behalf of Republican congressional and state candidates. These binders include itineraries, information on the state's politics, and government structure, statewide issues and local issues for specific urban areas. There are also substantial newspaper clippings detailing political themes and events in each state.

Subseries J.2: George L. Hinman, 1959-1970, 43 cu. ft. (FA346)
Scope: George L. Hinman (d. 1997) served as an executive assistant to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller. He was one of the governor's chief political advisors. A prominent attorney from Binghamton, New York, Hinman was at one time senior partner of the law firm of Hinman, Howard & Kattell, a firm he was associated with since 1930. Hinman was also Republican National Committeeman for New York State, as well as Delegate-at-large for three Republican National Conventions, 1960, 1964, and 1976.

Hinman first came to Nelson A. Rockefeller's attention in 1956, when he was named as counsel to the Temporary State Commission to Prepare for a Constitutional Convention, chaired by Rockefeller. Two years later, after Rockefeller was elected Governor, Hinman was chosen to be executive assistant. From 1960 to 1977, Hinman held the title of special counsel, Rockefeller Family and Associates.

Hinman was an important aide to Rockefeller during his four terms as Governor from 1959 to 1973, and through his tenure as Vice President under President Gerald Ford, from 1974 to 1977. Hinman also assisted Rockefeller in his unsuccessful campaigns for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1960, 1964, and 1968.

This subseries is divided into five sub-subseries:

Sub-subseries 1, General Correspondence, 1960-1970
These alphabetically arranged files contain correspondence from Hinman to individuals on political matters that concerned Republican politics, and Governor Rockefeller's role in the party. The majority of the letters are from Hinman himself, though a significant number are letters that were assigned to Hinman for acknowledgment by another member of the Governor's staff. In these cases, the correspondence includes the copy of the letter signed by Governor Rockefeller.

Many of the files include Hinman's "memorandum for files," which are his notations on individuals, telephone conversations with political operatives, or meeting notes from an encounter with the individual. Many prominent political individuals are represented here, including United States Senator and 1964 Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater; New York City Mayor John Lindsay; President Richard Nixon; Michigan Governor George Romney; and Pennsylvania Governor William Scranton.

Sub-subseries 2, State Files and Summaries, 1960-1970
The state files consist of letters from individuals arranged by state. There is some duplication of correspondence from the general correspondence between the state files and the general correspondence files in Sub-subseries 1 (above).
In addition to correspondence, the State Files also contain "trip books" which were prepared by Hinman in advance of a political visit by Governor Rockefeller. The majority of the State Files also contain copies of pages from the Congressional Quarterly that denote races in states around the country as well as political notes from that state. The notes contain frequent updates as Hinman interacted with prominent state individuals. The Summaries contain information gathered by Hinman and his staff.

Sub-subseries 3, Talent Files, 1960-1970
This small sub-subseries contains an alphabetically arranged file of individuals who were recommended to serve on Governor Rockefeller's staff. Some of the individuals sought positions by sending resumes and letters of interest to Hinman, while others were recommended by other members of Governor Rockefeller's staff or friends of Hinman.

Sub-subseries 4, Memos, 1959-1970
This sub-subseries contains a chronological series of memoranda sent to Governor Rockefeller by Hinman. The memos are entirely political in nature and deal with Governor Rockefeller's political status nationwide. Hinman indicated that many of the memos were "personal and confidential" and were to be viewed only by the Governor. They contain specific mentions of political rivals and strategies that could be implemented in future political campaigns.

Sub-subseries 5, Personal Correspondence, 1960-1968
This alphabetically arranged materials contains primarily political material collected by Hinman in his role as both Republican National Committeeman and chief political advisor to Governor Rockefeller.

Subseries J.3: Oscar M. Ruebhausen, 1967-1970, 3.5 cu. ft. (FA347)

Scope: Contains a portion of the files of Oscar M. Ruebhausen that were created primarily during Ruebhausen's service as head of DNA, a research organization for Nelson Rockefeller that Ruebhausen led during Rockefeller's campaign for the Republican presidential nomination in 1968. Some of the materials also cover Rockefeller's gubernatorial reelection campaign in 1970. The majority of these documents may also be found in other series of Rockefeller's papers, specifically the DNA and Issue Books series.

This subseries is organized in four sub-subseries:

Sub-subseries 1, Current Issues, 1968
This alphabetically arranged material consists of files created by the research staff of DNA for the 1968 presidential campaign. Included are reports and position papers as well as memos and correspondence with people outside the campaign offering expert advice on issues.

Sub-subseries 2, NAR Political, 1968
These files date primarily from May through July 1968, when Rockefeller was actively pursuing the Republican presidential nomination. They contain a variety of political information and advice given to Ruebhausen in his role as head of DNA or offered directly to Rockefeller, either by or through Ruebhausen. Of particular interest in this subseries are memoranda on how Rockefeller might proceed to win the general election if he successfully gained the Republican nomination.

Sub-subseries 3, OMR General, 1968
This small sub-subseries contains office memoranda and correspondence concerning Ruebhausen's tenure as head of DNA in 1968.

Sub-subseries 4, Notebooks and Reports, 1967-1970
This subseries consists of materials accumulated by DNA staff and the Answer Desk, a research group headed by Graham Molitor to assist with the presidential campaign. Also included in this series are two general issues polls of New York voters undertaken prior to the 1970 gubernatorial reelection.

Series K: Possessions, 1917-1976, 8.4 cu. ft. (FA011)

Scope: This series comprises files about broad categories of items owned by Nelson A. Rockefeller, ranging from his automobiles and boats to his porcelains and honorary degrees. There are ten boxes containing documentation on his real estate holdings in New York City, as well as general information regarding the Rockefeller family estate in Pocantico Hills, New York. Notably, this series does not include material on the specific residences where Nelson Rockefeller and his family resided in Pocantico Hills. Of special significance among the real estate files are four boxes on his Fifth Avenue apartment that date from 1934 to 1974. The earliest of this material includes correspondence about the interior design and furnishings by Parisian interior architect Jean-Michel Frank and Swiss sculptors Alberto and Diego Giacometti.

There is also information on the offices Nelson Rockefeller owned and operated at 22 West 55th Street in Manhattan, which served as the New York City Office of the Governor. He maintained this office during his 15-year tenure as Governor of New York, becoming one of the first governors to have a permanent office in New York City in addition to the executive chamber in the New York State Capitol in Albany.

Series L: Projects, 1932-1971, 121.5 cu. ft. (FA348)

Arrangement: Alphabetical by topic, organization, or personal name.

Scope: This general correspondence file offers further documentation of Rockefeller's vast business, civic, governmental, philanthropic, cultural, and social activities. Major files include Dartmouth College, Committee on Economic Development; Council for Inter-American Cooperation; Council on Foreign Relations; Institute for International Social Research; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Primitive Art; Whitney Museum of American Art; National Conference of Christians and Jews; Pan American Union (Organization of the American States); Rockefeller Center; United Jewish Appeal; United Nations; United States Council on International Economic Policy; United States Government; University of the Andes Foundation; Victory Clothing Drive for Overseas Relief; and Westchester County Board of Health.

Many of the subject files in this series were periodically weeded of routine correspondence by the clerical staff at the Rockefeller family office. These files are identified with the line: "Some material previous to [date] discarded."

Series M: Speeches, post-Vice Presidential, 1977-1979, 1.75 cu. ft. (FA349)

Arrangement: Chronological by date of speech.

Scope: This speech file was maintained by Hugh Morrow, Nelson Rockefeller's press secretary. Mr. Morrow was a speech writer for Mr. Rockefeller during his first term as Governor of New York and became his press secretary beginning with his second term in 1963. Mr. Morrow served Mr. Rockefeller throughout his term as Vice President and during his years as a private citizen before and after the Vice Presidency.

This collection of speeches and press releases reflects Rockefeller's transition from public official to a private citizen and offers some insight to his public activities during the last two years of his life. Mr. Rockefeller maintained his reputation as a knowledgeable and outspoken observer of politics and foreign affairs by accepting invitations to speak before political, civic, and private groups. He addressed issues such as the energy crisis, Soviet expansion, national security, and peace in the Middle East. After returning to private life, Mr. Rockefeller also indulged his passion for art by establishing two related businesses. The first was an art reproduction company, called the Nelson Rockefeller Collection, Inc. (NRC); the second was an art book publishing business, called Nelson Rockefeller Publications, Inc. This series includes press releases announcing the establishment and development of these two ventures. At Mr. Morrow's suggestion, Nelson Rockefeller began to cultivate a public image as an art dealer and art expert by accepting invitations to give lectures on art. Transcripts for two such lectures, on December 16, 1977, and November 15, 1978, are included. There is also a tape recording of the first one.

This series begins with files of some public remarks Mr. Rockefeller made during the last days of the Ford Administration in January 1977 and concludes with press releases on the memorial services after Rockefeller's death on January 26, 1979. The speech files contain one or more of four different versions of each speech: draft, reading copy, transcript, or press release. The folder descriptions list which versions exist for each speech. Drafts and reading copies are likely to include Mr. Rockefeller's handwritten changes and notations. A transcript is a verbatim record of the remarks, presumably made from a tape recording. For each speech, Mr. Morrow's office usually issued a press release containing excerpts of Mr. Rockefeller's remarks. Some files contain correspondence, schedules, or background information on the event at which the speech was given.

Series O: Washington, DC, 1940-1958, 1969-1970, 136 cu. ft. (FA350)

Arrangement: The series is divided into eight subseries that reflect the individual appointments--with the exception of Subseries 5, which consolidates Rockefeller's three government reorganization committee appointments--plus one additional subseries that contains declassified documents from two of his appointments.

The nine subseries are:

  1. Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs
  2. Assistant Secretary of State for American Republic Affairs.
  3. Inter-American Development Commission and Corporation
  4. International Development Advisory Board
  5. Subseries 5A: Special Committee on Government Organization (SCOGO); Subseries 5B: Reorganization Advisory Committee (RAC); Subseries 5C: President's Advisory Committee on Government Organization (PACGO)
  6. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW)
  7. Special Assistant to the President for Foreign Affairs
  8. Presidential Mission to Latin America
  9. Declassified Materials

Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, 1940-1944, 32.8 cu. ft.
In this position Rockefeller was responsible for the strategic defense of Latin America through work in the information, economic, health, sanitation, agricultural, transportation and cultural fields. The subseries includes 61 motion pictures produced for the Coordinator's Office.

Assistant Secretary of State for American Republic Affairs, 1944-1945, 2 cu. ft.
Topics addressed in this file include the Inter-American Conference on Problems of War and Peace, Mexico City, February 1945, and the United Nations Conference on International Organization, San Francisco, April 1945.

Inter-American Development Commission and Corporation, 1940-1947, 0.8 cu. ft.
Rockefeller was chairman of this international organization established to reorganize Latin American economies following the loss of European markets with the outbreak of World War II.

International Development Advisory Board, 1950-1951, 8.4 cu. ft.
Rockefeller chaired this board, charged with developing a plan for implementing President Harry S. Truman's Point IV program.

Reorganization Advisory Committee,
Special Committee on Government Organization,
President's Advisory Committee on Government Organization. 1952-1958, 14.8 cu. ft.
President-elect Dwight D. Eisenhower appointed Rockefeller to chair a committee to study the executive branch of the federal government and recommend improvements. The committee, whose other two members were Milton Eisenhower and Arthur Flemming, was known progressively by the three names above. It recommended thirteen major reorganization plans, ten of which were approved by Congress. One of the plans resulted in the creation of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Also included are records of Rockefeller's chairmanship of the Special Committee on the Reorganization of the Defense Department in 1953.

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1953-1954, 16.8 cu. ft.
As Under-Secretary of this department, Rockefeller was especially active in the department's legislative program, recommending measures that greatly expanded the coverage of the Social Security program.

Special Assistant to the President for Foreign Affairs, 1954-1955, 14.4 cu. ft.
In this position Rockefeller played a key role in developing the "Open Skies" policy and accompanied President Eisenhower to the Four Powers Conference in Geneva in 1955.

Presidential Mission to Latin America, 1969, 39 cu. ft.
At the request of President Richard M. Nixon, Rockefeller and a team of 23 advisors visited 20 American republics to solicit opinions of U.S. inter-American policies and to determine the needs and conditions of each country.

Series P: Ann C. Whitman, Politics, 1958-1973, 11 cu. ft. (FA351)

Biographical/Historical Sketch: In the 1950s, Ann Cook Whitman (1908-1991) worked for the Committee for a Free Europe. She was recruited to work for the Eisenhower presidential campaign in 1952, going on to work for Eisenhower as his personal secretary through his eight years in the White House and for a short time at President Eisenhower's retirement home, Gettysburg. In 1961, she went to work for George Hinman, political advisor to Governor Nelson Rockefeller. In 1965, she became Rockefeller's executive assistant. She went on to serve as Rockefeller's chief of staff during his Vice Presidential tenure. Whitman returned to New York, assisting Rockefeller, until her retirement in 1977.

Scope: Contains a portion of Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller's political correspondence on state and national issues. The correspondence reflects his role as a national political figure, and was filed separately from correspondence generated while serving as Governor of New York State. The series is arranged alphabetically. General correspondence files begin each index letter, followed by individual folders for other correspondents. Many incoming letters bear Governor Rockefeller's handwritten notations indicating the response he wished drafted.

There are several files of miscellaneous material at the end of the series. Included among these files are four folders of "Impeachment Letters, October - November 1973" (Box 23, Folders 530-533). The letters are from the public urging Governor Rockefeller to speak out about the constitutional crisis caused by the growing Watergate crisis. A majority of the letters ask Rockefeller to use his influence either to convince President Nixon that he should resign, or to convince Congress to impeach the President. Another file, titled "Drug Abuse Program" (Box 23, Folder 528), contains information on the genesis of the "Rockefeller drug laws" of 1973.

Series Q: Hugh Morrow Interviews, 1977-1980, 2.2 cu. ft. (FA352)

Arrangement:

Subseries 1: Interviews with Nelson A. Rockefeller
Subseries 2: Interviews with NAR Associates and Family Members

Biographical/Historical Sketch: Hugh Morrow variously served as Rockefeller's press secretary, speech writer, and director of communications beginning in 1960.

Subseries 1: Interviews with Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1977 July-November

Between July and November 1977, Hugh Morrow conducted 12 interviews with Nelson A. Rockefeller for the purpose of eventually coauthoring a biography of Rockefeller.

The subject matter varies greatly both within and among the interviews. However, the topics most widely discussed by Rockefeller are his interests and activities related to Latin America and his insights on the state of the nation and the world during and immediately following World War II. Rockefeller also provides his detailed impressions of several of the U.S. Presidents under whom he served or against whom he campaigned: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Richard M. Nixon. In the final interview (Folder 12), Rockefeller reflects on his tenure as Vice President in the Ford Administration. To some extent, throughout the interviews he also discusses his family, his childhood, and significant influences on his life while he was growing up. There are no indices to the individual transcripts.

Subseries 2: Interviews with NAR Associates and Family Members, 1979-1980

Following Nelson A. Rockefeller's death in January 1979, Hugh Morrow conducted interviews with Rockefeller's former associates and family members to document the memories of those people who had significant working and personal relationships with him. Between August 1979 and September 1980, Morrow interviewed 75 individuals. All but one of the interviews were tape recorded; Morrow made a transcript of the one unrecorded interview from his notes. A few interviews were summarized by Morrow, while all others were transcribed verbatim. The recording tapes were not saved.

Throughout the transcripts, topics range from politics to art and from foreign policy to family relationships and philanthropy. There is a heavy emphasis on Rockefeller's three presidential and four gubernatorial campaigns from 1958 to 1970. A number of the interviews also focus on New York State government programs and administration. Additionally, in some interviews there is discussion of Latin America and the organizations and programs that Rockefeller established or enhanced for that region of the globe. The transcripts are most useful as indications of how these individuals viewed particular issues and interacted with Nelson Rockefeller and his staff or family.

Access: Currently, except for two exceptions noted below, only transcripts of interviews with those individuals known to be deceased and on which at least some editing was completed are available for research.

In October 2013, Steven C. Rockefeller gave permission to open the transcript of his interview, which he edited in 2005. In February 2014, David Rockefeller gave permission to open the transcript of his interview, which he edited that same year. These are the only open transcripts from living individuals in this series.

Series R: Films (FA755)

Scope: Contents of these NAR Films have been separated from other archival holdings among the NAR papers.

Maps and Flat Files (FA437)

  • Series 4: Nelson A. Rockefeller papers
  • Scope: Contents of these NAR oversized materials have been separated from other archival holdings among the NAR papers.
  • Files pertain to Series A: Activities, Series C: Art, Series K: Possessions, Series O: Washington D.C. and Series Z: General.

Nelson A. Rockefeller Gubernatorial records

Date: 1947-1977

Bulk: 1959-1973

Extent: 731 cubic feet, 528 reels of microfilm

  • Series 2: Appointments Office, 1958-1970, 4.8 cu. ft. (FA353)
  • Series 3: Assembly and Senate Memos, 1959-1973, 20.25 cu. ft. (FA354)
  • Series 4: Joseph H. Boyd, 1963-1967, 1.2 cu. ft. (FA355)
  • Series 5: Campaigns, 1956-1970, 37.4 cu. ft. (FA440)
  • Series 7: James Cannon, 1968-1972, 7.5 cu. ft. (FA356)
  • Series 8: Affirmative Action (N. Lee Cook), 1970-1971, 1.2 cu. ft. (FA357)
  • Series 10: Counsel’s Office, 1958-1966, 70 cu. ft. (FA358)
  • Series 12: New York State Committee to Reelect the President, 1972-1973, 5 cu. ft. (FA359)
  • Series 13: Jerry A. Danzig, 1964-1973, 2.2 cu. ft. (FA360)
  • Series 14: Executive Chamber, 1958-1972, 2 cu. ft. (FA361)
  • Series 16: 55th Street, 1968-1975, 17.6 cu. ft. (FA362)
  • Series 17: Issue Books, 1959-1964, 16.3 cu. ft. (FA363)
  • Series 19: Arthur Massolo, 1966-1971, 1.3 cu. ft. (FA364)
  • Series 21: Hugh Morrow, 1958-1977, 42 cu. ft. (FA242)
  • Series 22: New York Office, 1959-1965, 25 cu. ft. (FA365)
  • Series 23: Civil Service Resolutions (Charles H. Palmer), 1959-1973, 4.8 cu. ft. (FA366)
  • Series 24: Political Files, 1959-1973, 116.4 cu. ft. (FA367)
  • Series 25: Press Office, 1958-1974, 109.2 cu. ft. (FA368)
  • Series 27: Public Relations, 1958-1972, 4.8 cu. ft. (FA369)
  • Series 28: Departmental reports, 1960-1973, 6 cu. ft. (FA370)
  • Series 29: William J. Ronan, 1947-1971 (Bulk: 1958-1971), 25 cu. ft. (FA371)
  • Series 33: Speeches, 1958-1973, 116.4 cu. ft. (FA372)
  • Series 34: Diane Van Wie, 1953-1973, 64 cu. ft. (FA373)
  • Series 35: Ann C. Whitman, Gubernatorial, 1966-1973, 27.6 cu. ft. (FA374)
  • Series 36: Gene Wyckoff, 1961-1965, 2.2 cu. ft. (FA375)
  • Series 37: New York Republican State Fundraising reports, 1967-1973, 1.2 cu. ft. (FA376)
  • Series 38: Office Subject Files, 1959-1973, 515 microfilm reels (FA439)
  • Series 39: Films (FA756)
  • Maps and Flat Files (FA437)
  • Albany Scrapbooks, 1958-1973, 13 microfilm reels (No finding aid)

Biographical/Historical Sketch:

Nelson A. Rockefeller served 4 consecutive terms as Governor of New York state, 1959-1973.

Series 2: Appointments Office, 1958-1970, 4.8 cu. ft. (FA353)

Scope: This series contains the office files of several members of Nelson A. Rockefeller's staff, primarily the Appointments Office, whose function was to sift through the letters of application received for positions in the Rockefeller administration. The series consists of correspondence with individuals applying for positions, as well as internal memoranda to and from other staff of the Appointments Office or to staff of the various state-level departments to which an applicant was referred. This is an incomplete portion of the Appointments Office correspondence, containing only three boxes of alphabetical correspondence, from C through L. The final box of the series contains miscellaneous subject files, 1967-1970. Alphabetically arranged by topic, this portion of the series is also incomplete. The material contained within these files may be duplicated within the official gubernatorial record, maintained on microfilm at both the New York State Archives and the Rockefeller Archive Center.

Series 3: Assembly and Senate Memos, 1959-1973, 20.25 cu. ft. (FA354)

Scope: This series contains a comprehensive collection of the bills submitted to Nelson A. Rockefeller for approval during his tenure as Governor of New York State, an office he held through four terms from 1959 to 1973. As the chief executive of the state, Rockefeller signed all bills into law, or vetoed them. Each bill that was submitted to Rockefeller for his signature was accompanied by a memorandum from the Counsel to the Governor. These memoranda denoted the subject and purpose of the bill, including the original sponsor of the bill; brief comments offering background on the legislation; and the recommendation of the Counsel. The Counsel would usually conclude the memo with a recommendation of "Approval" or "Disapproval." In either case, the legislation may also have been signed or vetoed with an accompanying memorandum from Rockefeller.

Bills from the Legislature included some that were very specific, i.e., Assembly Bill 3228, submitted to the Governor, April 4, 1962, which extended "from May 1 to May 31 the period during which certain specified officers may kill dogs pursuing or killing deer." This bill was approved. Others reflect a special interest, i.e., a 1970 bill "to provide certain members of the Nassau County Police Department with a retirement allowance equal to 'full salary at the date of retirement' after thirty-five years of service" was disapproved on the recommendation of the Nassau County government, and the Offices of Civil Service and Budget.

The series concludes with two folders of "Memoranda of Law" that address issues arising in New York State that required extra-legislative action, for example, a November 7, 1960 Memorandum concerning the "Governor's Action to Impound Election Records." Such memoranda were written to inform the Governor of a question or a challenge regarding a recently enacted law or action by the NYS government.

Series 4: Joseph H. Boyd, 1963-1967, 1.2 cu. ft. (FA355)

Scope: This series contains a portion of the files of Joseph H. Boyd from his tenure as Congressional liaison officer for Governor Rockefeller. During 1967, Boyd maintained an office in Washington, DC, and held regular meetings with members of the New York State Congressional delegation. Almost all of the files pertain to that year. Boyd also served as Rockefeller's liaison to the New York State Legislature during this time. The other files in this series reflect his prior service as a Special Assistant to the Governor. Of note are memoranda and correspondence from Henry Kissinger and Edward Teller on such topics as foreign policy, defense spending, and the nuclear test ban treaty before the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1963.

Series 5: Campaigns, 1956-1970, 37.4 cu. ft. (FA440)

Arrangement: Arranged in 7 subseries as follows:

  1. New York State Citizens for Eisenhower, 1956 Presidential Campaign
  2. Citizens for Rockefeller-Keating, 1958 Gubernatorial Campaign
  3. Citizens for Rockefeller-Javitz, 1962 Gubernatorial Campaign
  4. 1966 Gubernatorial Campaign
  5. 1970 Gubernatorial Campaign
  6. 1960 Presidential Campaign
  7. 1964 Presidential Campaign

Series 7: James Cannon, 1968-1972, 7.5 cu. ft. (FA356)

Arrangement: Two subseries as follows, with details below:

  1. Revenue Sharing, 1971-1972
  2. Latin American Mission, 1968-1972

Scope: This series contains a portion of the files of James Cannon that were created primarily during his tenure as an executive assistant to Governor Rockefeller. Cannon worked in the New York State Washington Office in the early 1970s and reported on fiscal and revenue sharing matters in the U.S. Congress. In 1969, Cannon was part of the governor's staff on the Presidential Mission to Latin America.

Subseries 1, Revenue Sharing, 1971-1972, 1.6 cu. ft.
This subseries primarily concerns Cannon's tenure in Washington, DC, where he attended to fiscal matters before the U.S. Congress on behalf of Governor Rockefeller, representing the interests of the Rockefeller administration to the members of the state's Congressional Delegation. Among the issues documented is the State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act of 1972. Of note is one folder of material that concerns the General Grant Revenue Act of 1971, proposed by New York Congressmen Hugh Carey and Ed Koch.

Subseries 2, Latin American Mission, 1968-1972, 5.2 cu. ft.
In 1969 President Richard M. Nixon appointed Rockefeller to undertake a Presidential Mission to Latin America to consult with leaders and determine the needs and conditions there. Rockefeller toured 20 Latin American countries during the visit. This subseries contains a small sample of the documentation of the mission. Notable is correspondence with members of President Nixon's staff, specifically National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger, who monitored the mission from Washington. Additional extensive materials on the Latin American Mission may be found in the Washington, DC series in Record Group 4 of the Nelson A. Rockefeller Papers (Boxes 98-201).

Series 8: Affirmative Action (N. Lee Cook), 1970-1971, 1.2 cu. ft. (FA357)

Scope: The majority of the files contain significant documentation of the Affirmative Action Program of Greater Buffalo (BAAP) and the work undertaken by that organization in 1970 and 1971. Primarily, these files deal with construction issues and equal employment opportunities, as well as affirmative action concerns on construction sites around New York State.

Biographical Historical Sketch: N. Lee Cook, served as a program assistant for Governor Rockefeller.

Series 10: Counsel’s Office, 1958-1966, 70 cu. ft. (FA358)

Arrangement: Arranged in three subseries as follows (details below):

  1. Robert MaCrate
  2. Neil Corbin
  3. Robert R. Douglass

Biographical/Historical Sketch:

The primary responsibility of counsel to the governor was to translate the governor's programs into law. He and his staff ensured that bills were correctly drafted and helped to prevent enactment of bills that were antithetical to the governor's programs. Along with the budget director and the secretary to the governor, the counsel was one of the people on whom Governor Rockefeller relied most heavily for administration and program development.

Subseries 1. Robert MacCrate, 1958-(1959-1962)-1966
This subseries contains a small portion of the files of Robert MacCrate, who served as associate counsel (Feb. 2, 1959-June 1, 1959) and then counsel (June 1, 1959-June 30, 1962) to Governor Rockefeller.

Subseries 2. S. Neil Corbin, 1958-1965
This subseries contains a small portion of the files of Sol Neil Corbin who served as assistant counsel (Jan. 14, 1959 - June 1, 1961) and then counsel (July 1, 1962 - Sept. 1, 1965) to Governor Rockefeller. The principal topics are housing and urban renewal. Major issues include the creation of the New York State Housing Finance Agency and the consolidation, clarification and simplification of urban renewal and housing laws.

Subseries 3. Robert R. Douglass, 1959-1972
Arrangement: Arranged alphabetically by subject matter and then arbitrarily within each subject. The final subject, General Government, is a broad heading for several topics, including politics, presidential campaigns, and welfare.

Scope: This subseries contains a portion of the files of Robert R. Douglass (RRD) from his years as Counsel to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (September 1965-December 1970) and then as Secretary to the Governor (January 1971-August 1972).

Reflecting his time as Counsel to the Governor, Douglass's files are replete with information on most of the programs and policies from the Rockefeller years and include extensive materials dealing with the New York Constitutional Convention of 1967. The proposed new constitution was narrowly adopted at the contentious convention and was overwhelmingly defeated by the voters in the November 1967 election. Also of note are Douglass's files dealing with the creation of the Narcotics Addiction Control Commission and the Taylor Law, which prohibits strikes by public employees. The series also documents Douglass's role as chairman of Rockefeller's 1968 presidential campaign.

Series 12: New York State Committee to Reelect the President, 1972-1973, 5 cu. ft. (FA359)

Scope: These fragmentary materials document aspects of the 1972 presidential election. Included are receipts for contributions made to the New York State Committee to Reelect the President and cancelled administrative checks indicating the costs associated with running a presidential campaign.

Series 13: Jerry A. Danzig, 1964-1973, 2.2 cu. ft. (FA360)

Arrangement: Three subseries (detailed below):

  1. Executive Chamber
  2. Subject Files
  3. Miscellaneous

Scope: Documents the majority of Jerry Danzig's service as Nelson A. Rockefeller's Special Assistant to the Governor for Radio and Television, from 1964 to 1973. The files consist of Danzig's internal memoranda and correspondence regarding Governor Rockefeller's radio and television appearances; bills and invoices for the production, distribution, and broadcast of television promotions; and budgets and expense accounts for programs. There are also scripts and transcripts of short promotional films on Rockefeller. Additional Danzig material is also located in Series 22 New York Office series, which deals primarily with the 1964 presidential campaign.

Subseries 1, Executive Chamber, 1964-1965. 1.2 cu. ft.
This subseries covers the eight Executive Chamber television programs produced and shown throughout New York State on a variety of issues. For additional Executive Chamber material, see the Gene Wyckoff series (Series 36).

Subseries 2, Subject Files, 1964-1971. 0.5 cu. ft.
Arrangement: Alphabetical.
Scope: Documents a broad range of general topics from nearly the entire tenure of Danzig's service as Special Assistant. Two folders are of particular note. Folder 48 contains information on the creation of the New York State Lottery System and reflects Danzig's role in determining how to promote the lottery on television. Folder 41 contains a transcript of "The Extremists," a political program produced for the 1964 California Republican presidential primary but never aired, at Governor Rockefeller's request. This folder also has a copy of an article from a San Francisco newspaper on the program and the effect it might have had on the outcome of the primary, won by Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater, who went on to win the Republican nomination for president in 1964.

Subseries 3, Miscellaneous, 1964-1973. 0.5 cu. ft.
Most prominent are three folders of correspondence on the logistics of Governor Rockefeller's "town meetings," a series of open meetings across the state with community leaders and the public that were often filmed for local broadcast. Also included here are materials on "The Nelson Rockefeller Story," filmed for the 1964 presidential campaign.

Series 14: Executive Chamber, 1958-1972, 2 cu. ft. (FA361)

Scope: Consists primarily of correspondence from New York State residents to members of Governor Rockefeller's staff, specifically those working on the Gubernatorial Executive Branch staff. The correspondence is congenial, thanking the staff members for meeting with them or thanking the staff member for appearing at an event on the Governor's behalf. Many members of the executive staff are represented here, although the series is dominated by correspondence with Alexander Aldrich, who began his career with New York State as director of the Division for Youth in 1960; Richard Amper, Governor Rockefeller's first press secretary; and his successor, Robert McManus. who served as press secretary until 1966, when he was appointed to be an executive assistant to the governor.

Series 16: 55th Street, 1968-1975, 17.6 cu. ft. (FA362)

Arrangement: Organized in six subseries (detailed below):

  1. Trips
  2. Schedules
  3. Correspondence Files
  4. Letters of Support Regarding the Vice Presidential Nomination
  5. Subject Files of Kathy Huldrum and Nancy Towell, 1970-1974
  6. Invitations

Scope: This series documents portions of Nelson A. Rockefeller's public and private activities between 1968 and 1974. These records were created and maintained by members of Rockefeller's staff at his office at 22 West 55th Street, New York, also called the New York Office.

Biographical/Historical Sketch: Rockefeller was one of the first New York governors to maintain a permanent office in New York City. In general, Rockefeller was in Albany only while the Legislature was in session or for special occasions. The management of his public duties was undertaken largely at 55th Street. The office was paid for privately by Rockefeller, but many of the staff were public employees. When he resigned as governor, on December 20, 1973, some of the staff became Rockefeller's personal employees and some of them joined the staff of the Commission on Critical Choices for Americans. Some of them went on the federal payroll and moved to Washington, D.C. when Rockefeller became Vice President of the United States on December 19, 1974.

Subseries 1: Trips, 1973-1974. This subseries documents Rockefeller's trips around the country after leaving the governorship and before becoming Vice President. There is a separate file for each trip. The documentation includes correspondence, interoffice memoranda, and itineraries regarding the trip and the event which he was attending. Rockefeller was invited to speak at most of the events, some files include transcripts of his speech or remarks.
Arrangement: Chronological.

Subseries 2:Schedules, 1969-1975. This subseries consists of Rockefeller's daily itineraries, as maintained by Nancy Towell. Some files contain correspondence and interoffice memoranda regarding specific events. Copies of the schedules, printed on pink paper, were distributed to Rockefeller's "advance staff" and other staff members responsible for arranging and overseeing the logistics of his travels.
Arrangement: Chronological.

Subseries 3:Correspondence Files, 1968-1974. These files were maintained by Ann Whitman, Rockefeller's personal secretary. It consists mostly of outgoing correspondence, although there are some incoming letters. The correspondence is with heads of state, American political figures, and private citizens. The correspondence covers a broad range of issues and reflects Rockefeller's policy of giving each letter writer a proper response. There is a separate file for each year, the correspondence is arranged alphabetically thereunder. At the end of the subseries are two folders of letters to John Mitchell, Attorney General of the United States, and John Ehrlichman, Counsel to President Richard M. Nixon. There is no indication as to why this correspondence was segregated.

Subseries 4:Letters of Support Regarding the Vice Presidential Nomination, 1974. On August 20, 1974, President Gerald R. Ford selected Rockefeller to fill the vacant vice presidency following President Richard M. Nixon's resignation on August 9. Many private citizens and public officials sent Rockefeller letters of congratulation and support after the announcement of the selection, during the lengthy confirmation hearings, and upon his inauguration on December 19, 1974. Some of the letters are here, however, the subseries consists primarily of carbon copies of Rockefeller's acknowledgments.
Arrangement: Alphabetical.

Subseries 5: Subject Files of Kathy Huldrum and Nancy Towell, 1970-1974. Kathy Huldrum and Nancy Towell were assistants to Ann Whitman, Rockefeller's personal secretary. Subjects include Rockefeller's 1970 gubernatorial reelection campaign; the 1973 Republican Governor's Conference, hosted by Rockefeller; the National Commission on Water Quality, chaired by Rockefeller; and preparations for the vice presidential confirmation hearings. There is also a large amount of material regarding the Commission on Critical Choices for Americans, a private study project on national public policy initiated and chaired by Rockefeller, and "The Modern State in a Changing World," a New York State funded study project which preceded and inspired the Critical Choices Commission.

Subseries 6:Invitations, 1972-1974. This subseries is Nancy Towell's invitation file. It is divided into two parts: Invitations Received, which includes invitations to Rockefeller to attend various events, fund raisers, dinners, receptions, openings, etc.; and Letters Out, which consists of carbon copies of Rockefeller's letters of regret. Letters Out also contains some staff memos to Rockefeller asking him whether to accept or "regret" an invitation, and interoffice memoranda regarding Rockefeller's schedule.

Series 17: Issue Books, 1959-1964, 16.3 cu. ft. (FA363)

Arrangement: Arranged in two subseries (detailed below):

  1. Issue Books for the 1964 Presidential Election
  2. Issue Books for the First Gubernatorial Term, 1958-1962

Scope: This series consists of more than eighty volumes of Issue Books, which contain statements and press releases issued by the Gubernatorial Press Office in response to important political and policy issues. Governor Rockefeller also had many experts write background papers on various subjects. In most cases, these papers are coupled with summary papers or supporting memoranda to assist the governor in formulating a position.

Subseries 1, Issue Books for the 1964 Presidential Election, 1959-1964, 10 cu. ft.
The volumes in this subseries contain memoranda from Governor Rockefeller's staff and advisors. Much of the material was prepared under the supervision of Roswell B. Perkins, one of Rockefeller's chief advisors. Found throughout the volumes are draft "Platform Planks" submitted for consideration in the 1964 Republican Platform, and selections from the "Current Positions Notebook," which outlined Governor Rockefeller's stands on a variety of issues. The subseries also includes many background papers written by consultants engaged by Governor Rockefeller. Since material in this subseries was gathered primarily for the 1964 presidential election, a majority of the material contains analyses of Kennedy and Johnson administration proposals and stands on issues, as well as evaluations of positions held by Senator Barry M. Goldwater. Also included are campaign-related materials, such as pamphlets and position cards.

Subseries 2, Issue Books for the First Gubernatorial Term, 1958-1962, 6 cu. ft.
The volumes in this subseries contain memoranda from Governor Rockefeller's staff and advisors that focus on New York State issues. The subseries primarily consists of statements and speeches made by Governor Rockefeller on issues affecting New York. Of note are press releases issued by the governor's office of "Veto Memorandum" explaining why the governor chose not to sign a bill into law. Also included are copies of enacted legislation, a number of campaign statements issued by the Rockefeller campaign prior in 1958, and year-end summaries that note the administration's accomplishments on various issues.

Series 19: Arthur Massolo, 1966-1971, 1.3 cu. ft. (FA364)

Scope: Contains a small portion of the office files of Arthur Massolo. This incomplete selection of papers is composed entirely of correspondence with individuals seeking employment in the Rockefeller administration. As Assistant Appointments Officer, Massolo forwarded the correspondence to the appropriate department and often included cover memoranda with recommendations to the department heads.

Biographical/Historical Sketch: Arthur Massolo, who served in the Appointments Office during Governor Rockefeller's third term.

Series 21: Hugh Morrow, 1958-1977, 42 cu. ft. (FA242)

Arrangement: Arranged in 6 subseries as follows:

  1. General Files
  2. Campaign Files, Presidential
  3. Campaign Files, 1970 Gubernatorial
  4. Speech Transcripts
  5. Vice Presidential Press Releases
  6. Subject Files.

Scope: Contains the papers of Hugh Morrow, a member of the executive staff of Nelson A. Rockefeller during Rockefeller's service as governor of New York State and vice president of the United States.

Morrow's papers include miscellaneous files on state and national issues; speeches, articles, and campaign materials used during Rockefeller's bids for the presidency in 1964 and 1968 and his gubernatorial reelection campaign in 1970; speech transcripts from Rockefeller's last term as governor (1971-1974); transcripts of interviews, press conferences and speeches during Rockefeller's term as vice presidential (1975-1976); and Morrow's subject files, 1955-1974.

Biographical/Historical Sketch: Hugh Morrow (1915-1991) was a newspaper reporter in his native Pennsylvania and in Washington, D.C., before becoming an associate editor of the Saturday Evening Post for ten years. He joined the staff of Governor Rockefeller in November 1959 as a speechwriter and a special assistant. Morrow was appointed Director of Communications in February 1969, and in 1974 became Vice President Rockefeller's Press Secretary.

Series 22: New York Office, 1959-1965, 25 cu. ft. (FA365)

Arrangement: Arranged in six subseries (detailed below):

  1. Appointments Office
  2. Campaign for the 1964 Republican Presidential Nomination
  3. Special Assistant to the Governor for Radio and Television
  4. Gene Hinman and Irene Slater Files
  5. Rockefeller for President Citizens Information Center

Scope: This series contains the office files of Carl Spad, Michael Scelsi, Roswell B. Perkins, Graham T. Molitor, Jerry Danzig, George Hinman, Ilene Slater, and Alexander Halpern. It documents the official activities of these individuals in the execution of their duties as members of Nelson A. Rockefeller's gubernatorial and/or political campaign staffs. This series primarily documents Rockefeller's travel and public appearances during his first two terms as governor; portions of his 1962 gubernatorial reelection campaign; and portions of his campaigns for the Republican presidential nomination in 1960 and 1964. (Biographical sketches of most of these staff members are included at the end of this Scope and Content Note.)

Biographical/Historical Sketch: Prior to his election as Governor of New York State in November 1958, Nelson A. Rockefeller maintained an office at Rockefeller Center in New York City. In order to separate his work as Governor from his private activities, Governor Rockefeller established an office in New York City at 22 West 55th Street. This became known as the New York Office to distinguish it from the Governor's office in the state capitol building in Albany. Governor Rockefeller was the first New York Governor to maintain a permanent office in New York City. In general, Governor Rockefeller was in Albany only when the Legislature was in session or for a special occasion. The management of his public duties was largely undertaken from the New York Office.

JERRY DANZIGwas born in New York City in 1913. He graduated from the Horace Mann School for Boys in New York and earned a B. A. degree from Dartmouth in 1934. He served in a variety of management and executive positions for broadcasting companies in New York City, including radio stations WOR and WINS and television stations CBS and NBC. In 1961 he served as a television and radio consultant to the New York Republican City Committee and in 1962 became Special Assistant to the Governor for Radio and Television, a position he held until 1976. In this position Danzig's responsibilities included the production and distribution of radio and television commercials for Gov. Rockefeller's gubernatorial and presidential campaigns. In 1973 Gov. Rockefeller appointed Danzig as a member of the New York State Commission on Cable TV, on which he served until 1981. Danzig was a partner in Chester Burger & Co., a management consulting firm, from 1976 until 1985, when he became a consultant to the National Executive Service Corps.

GEORGE L. HINMANwas born in Binghamton, New York in 1905. A graduate of Princeton University, he also earned a bachelor of laws degree from Harvard University. He held directorships in many companies, including International Business Machines and New York Telephone, and also was a member of the executive committee of the Salvation Army New York State Advisory Conference. Hinman was at one time senior partner of the law firm of Hinman, Howard & Kattell of Binghamton, a firm he was associated with since 1930. In his capacity as an attorney, he was special counsel to the Rockefeller Family & Associates. He also was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York (1948-1950). After serving with the Governor, he was appointed to the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York in 1965. He also served as trustee of both Colgate University and Elmira College. In addition to his position of executive assistant to the Governor (1958-1959), Hinman's state service included service as Counsel for the New York State Temporary Commission on the Constitutional Convention and the Special Legislative Committee on the Revision and Simplification of the Constitution (1956-1958); a member of the New York State Attorney General's Committee on Ethical Standards in Government (1955-1959); and a member of the New York State Lt. Governor's Committee on Teachers' Salaries in 1951. Hinman also was Republican National Committeeman for New York State, as well as Delegate-at-large for the Republican National Conventions in both 1960 and 1964.

GRAHAM THOMAS TATE MOLITOR, born in Seattle in 1934, earned a B.A. degree from the University of Washington in 1955 and an LL.B. degree from the American University in 1963. Admitted to the bar in the District of Columbia in 1963, he worked as a court bailiff in the District of Columbia and as a legislative counsel in the House of Representatives, then was hired as Director of Candidate Research of the Rockefeller for President Committee in 1963. He was responsible for monitoring and analyzing statements made by other candidates for the Republican presidential nomination. He served until Gov. Rockefeller withdrew his candidacy in 1964, and then served in the same capacity again in Gov. Rockefeller's 1968 presidential campaign. From 1963 to 1977 he worked as a lobbyist for the food industry. In 1977 he established Public Policy Forecasting, Inc., and has written, lectured, consulted and participated in numerous public policy conferences all regarding future trends in food, technology and related public policy issues.

ROSWELL B. "ROD" PERKINSwas born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1926. He received an A.B. degree in 1945 and LL.B. in 1949, both from Harvard University. Admitted to the bar in Massachusetts and New York in 1949, he spent his entire law career with the New York law firm of Debevoise, Plimpton, becoming a partner in 1957. He met Nelson Rockefeller when the two men worked for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, where Perkins served as Assistant Secretary (1954-1956). Perkins worked on Rockefeller's 1958 gubernatorial campaign and some of his later campaigns. After the election in 1958 he assisted in establishing the new Rockefeller administration and served as Rockefeller's first Counsel to the Governor. As agreed to before hand, Perkins resigned as Counsel on June 1, 1959, and returned to private practice.

MICHAEL N. SCELSIgraduated from Louisiana State University with a degree in government in 1941. As a United States Marine during World War II, he was stationed in the Pacific. From 1946 to 1948, he worked with the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and its successor agency, the International Refugee Organization. He was also very active in community and civic affairs in his native Broome County (NY). Prior to joining the Governor's staff, Scelsi worked in college administration, primarily at Harpur College of the State University of New York at Binghamton, then serves as Assistant Industrial Commissioner in the New York State Department of Labor. From 1959 to 1965 he served as executive director of the New York Republican State Committee. On February 1, 1967, after serving as Appointments Officer for two years, Governor Rockefeller appointed Scelsi to the New York State Civil Service Commission.

ILENE J. SLATERwas graduated from Hunter High School in New York City, and received a B.A. degree from Mount Holyoke College in 1947. She also attended the Graduate Institute of International Relations (1947-1948), located at the University of Geneva, in Geneva, Switzerland. She went on to work for the National Bureau of Economic Research (1948-1949), the English Speaking Union (1949-1950), the International Development Advisory Board (1951), the White House administrative staff (1953-1957), and the U.S. Commission for the Brussels Fair (1957-1958). In February of 1958, Ms. Slater became an assistant in the Offices of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and went on to join the Governor's personal staff in July 1958.

CARL SPADwas born in 1904, in Brooklyn, New York, and was educated in New York and Westchester county public schools. He maintained a manufacturer's representative office in New York City (1941-1947), served as a sales manager for a fuel oil concern (1947-1952), and was president of the New York State Association of Young Republican Clubs and Youth Director for the Republican State Committee (1952-1954). He also served as an executive assistant to the New York State Building Code Commission (1954-1956) and as assistant to New York State Republican Chairman, L. Judson Morhouse (1956-1959). Spad served as Gov. Rockefeller's Appointments Officer from 1959 until 1965, when he resigned.

Subseries 1: Appointments Office, 1959-1965, 9 cu. ft. The Appointments Office maintained the Governor's schedule in this period. The Appointments Officer and his staff reviewed invitations to the Governor to speak or to attend events, and arranged the Governor's travel itineraries. They made arrangements for travel and accommodations and made sure that proper protocol was followed. This material also documents Rockefeller's extensive campaign trips in 1960, 1962 and 1964. The files are arranged chronologically and date from November 1959 to December 1965. They contain correspondence; internal memoranda; the staff's handwritten notes regarding itineraries and scheduling problems; published itineraries for the benefit of the press; background information on the host organization for the benefit of Governor Rockefeller; transcripts of Governor Rockefeller's speeches and press conferences; programs from some events; lists of people to thank for assistance with some trips; and newspaper clippings. Some memoranda and letters contain Governor Rockefeller's handwritten comments. Correspondence regarding events Governor Rockefeller did not attend are filed as "Regrets."

The first Appointments Officer was Carl Spad. He left in 1964 to head the New York State Republican Committee and was replaced by Michael Scelsi. The Appointments Secretaries were Margaret Fowler and Margaret Vilar. The cancellation of Governor Rockefeller's scheduled appearances in late November and early December of 1961 reflect his sudden trip to New Guinea to aid in the search for his son, Michael, who had disappeared there.

Subseries 2: Campaign for the 1964 Republican Presidential Nomination, March 1963-June 1964. 1.5 cu. ft. This subseries contains memoranda between Roswell B. Perkins and Graham T. Molitor. Mr. Perkins, a lawyer and a partner in the law firm of Debevoise, Plimpton had served as Governor Rockefeller's first Counsel to the Governor in 1959. In Governor Rockefeller's 1964 presidential campaign, he was responsible for monitoring statements made by other candidates vying for the Republican presidential nomination. Mr. Molitor was a lawyer and legislative researcher who was hired as Director of Candidate Research for the Rockefeller campaign. The subseries is arranged chronologically with a separate file for each statement made by a candidate or a statement made about a candidate by the media. Most of the files contain Mr. Perkins' and Mr. Molitor's analysis and comments of the statement. Most of the files are on Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona. Other individuals represented include former vice-president Richard Nixon, Governor George Romney of Michigan, and Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania. Also included in this subseries are scripts for television advertisements endorsing Governor Rockefeller and some reports from "Radio/TV Reports, Inc." which summarizes local electronic media coverage of Governor Rockefeller and the campaign.

Subseries 3: Special Assistant to the Governor for Radio and Television, 1961-1965, 3 cu. ft. These are files of Jerry Danzig, a former television executive who served as Special Assistant to the Governor for Radio and Television. Most of the information in this subseries concerns the 1964 presidential campaign. The remainder concerns the 1962 gubernatorial campaign. The subseries consists of Mr. Danzig's internal memoranda and correspondence regarding Governor Rockefeller's radio and television appearances; bills and invoices for the production, distribution and broadcasting of television promotions; budgets and expense accounts for the 1962 Gubernatorial campaign; files on campaign trips; and campaign literature. There are also scripts and transcripts of short promotional films on Governor Rockefeller. However, it is, unclear which, if any, of these films were ever broadcast. At least one appears never to have been used; the script for a French language television commercial produced for New Hampshire bear the words "not used" in Governor Rockefeller's handwriting. There are also some reports from "Radio/TV Reports, Inc." The subseries is arranged alphabetically by subject.

Subseries 4: George Hinman and Ilene Slater Files, 1959-1962, 6 cu. ft. George Hinman and Ilene Slater were executive assistants to Governor Rockefeller. In 1959, they were assigned the responsibility of exploring Governor Rockefeller's chances of winning the Republican presidential nomination in 1960. The subseries is broken into two parts: State Files and Subject Files. The files are arranged alphabetically and, for the most part covers the period from late 1959 to early 1960. Some items are dated as late as 1962.

The State Files include such information as the names of each state's government officials; a list of delegates to the 1956 Republican Convention; correspondence with supporters of Governor Rockefeller; invitations to speak to groups of supporters; schedules for trips; thank you letters; and clippings. There are also files for the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Within the Subject Files is correspondence with supporters and groups seeking to draft Governor Rockefeller; memoranda; and notices and reports regarding different phases of the 1960 campaign. At the end of this section are several files dealing specifically with the 1960 Republican Convention. (In his capacity as a Republican National Committeeman, Hinman was involved in the process of choosing delegates to the nominating conventions.) Within these files is one entitled "Convention Speeches" containing Governor Rockefeller's handwritten copy of his speech nominating Richard Nixon as the Republican presidential candidate.

Also included in this subseries is George Hinman's "Talent File." This consists of approximately 300 blue 3" x 5" index cards. On each card is the name and address of an individual and a brief description of that person's talents, experience, contacts, and sometimes another person's opinion of that individual. Many of the cards are dated indicating that this file was created in 1962 and 1963. An undated note at the beginning of the file reads, "Not useful at present - return to Ilene [Slater]." The Talent File is in Box 21 at the end of the series.

Subseries 5, Rockefeller for President Citizens Information Center, 1958-1960, 1.5 cu ft. These are the files of Alexander Halpern, chairman of the Rockefeller for President Citizens Information Center, a private group that sought to promote Governor Rockefeller candidacy for president in 1960. The CIC, as it was called, acted as a distribution center for information about Governor Rockefeller. It was established in response to requests for information about Rockefeller from independent groups around the country which were seeking the Republican nomination for him. The CIC was conceived in the summer of 1959 by a group of Governor Rockefeller's friends and supporters. This group included R. Burdell Bixby, George L. Hinman, L. Judson Morehouse, Roswell B. Perkins, Oren Root, Oscar M. Ruebhausen, and Mr. Halpern. It was formally organized in September 1959, and an office was opened in the Belmont Plaza Hotel on Lexington Avenue, New York, in October. The CIC ceased operation on December 28, 1959, two days after Governor Rockefeller announced that he would not seek the nomination. At that time Halpern requested that other Rockefeller for President Committees throughout the country also cease activities. Nevertheless, throughout most of 1960 letters continued to arrive from individuals urging Governor Rockefeller to run for president.

The subseries is divided into three portions: General Files, State Files, and Card Files. The General Files contain office memoranda; correspondence; and lists of volunteers and of "Rockefeller for President" organizations. The State Files consist of correspondence with individuals from various states. Both files are arranged alphabetically. The Card Files consist of approximately 800 4" x 6" blue and white index cards arranged by state. The cards contain addresses of political organizations, citizens groups, campaign volunteers, and abstracts of polls taken by independent organizations. The cards can also be used to locate correspondence with individuals filed in the State Files of this subseries.

Series 23: Civil Service Resolutions (Charles H. Palmer), 1959-1973, 4.8 cu. ft. (FA366)

Scope: Consists of resolutions forwarded to Charles H. Palmer, Assistant Secretary to the Governor for Reports, from the New York Department of Civil Service. Each year of Governor Rockefeller's gubernatorial tenure is represented by resolutions that were approved by him on Palmer's recommendation and those resolutions that were "Withdrawn or Withheld" at the request of the head of the Civil Service Department. Civil Service Resolutions were adopted by New York State to increase or decrease the number of positions in the state government. Resolutions were not specific to an individual, but rather to a position or title.

Series 24: Political Files, 1959-1973, 116.4 cu. ft. (FA367)

Arrangement: Arranged in 9 subseries as follows:

  1. Politics, 1959-1960
  2. Politics, 1961-1962
  3. Politics, 1963-1964
  4. Politics, 1965, 1967
  5. Politics, 1968-1969
  6. Politics, 1970-1971
  7. Politics, 1972-1973
  8. Thank You Letters, 1968-1972
  9. Assorted Campaign and Political Materials, 1962-1970

Scope: Contains constituent correspondence during Nelson A. Rockefeller's four terms as governor of New York, and particularly the elections in 1958, 1962, 1966, and 1970. The series also reflects Rockefeller's presidential campaign efforts in 1964 and 1968. The bulk of the material is correspondence between the Governor's office and state constituents, as well as citizens from across the country and around the world.

Series 25: Press Office, 1958-1974, 109.2 cu. ft. (FA368)

Arrangement: Organized in nine subseries as follows:

  1. Public Relations Files
  2. Latin American Mission
  3. Agency and Commission Reports
  4. Positions and Policy Papers
  5. Political and Election Analysis Files
  6. County Visits
  7. Recommendations to Fill U.S. Senate Seat Following Robert F. Kennedy's Assassination, 1968
  8. Miscellaneous
  9. Statements and Press Releases

Scope: Contains press releases documenting Rockefeller's governmental and political activities. Also included are transcripts of Rockefeller's speeches; travel itineraries and schedules; and some background material. Topics include his "Town Meetings" (1967, 1969, 1972); his Presidential Mission to Latin America (1969); and his campaigns for the Republican presidential nomination. The series continues to October 16, 1974 and includes his Critical Choices Commission, Watergate, and his appointment as vice president. The series also contains 371 reports issued by New York State agencies and commissions; position papers for Rockefeller and other candidates in the 1964 and 1968 presidential campaigns; analysis of public opinion surveys on various issues; and background information on local issues in each county of New York (1962).

Series 27: Public Relations, 1958-1972, 4.8 cu. ft. (FA369)

Arrangement: Arranged in 3 subseries as follows:

  1. Books and Articles, 1960-1971
  2. Speeches, 1960-1964
  3. Campaign Material, 1958-1972

Scope: Contains a small portion of the files of Hugh Morrow, who served as a speech writer and special assistant to Governor Rockefeller from November 1959 and was appointed Director of Communications on February 4, 1969.

Series 28: Departmental reports, 1960-1973, 6 cu. ft. (FA370)

Arrangement: The reports are arranged alphabetically by department, chronologically there under.

Scope: Consists of periodic reports prepared by New York State departments and agencies for the governor. The reports are of four different types (program meeting reports, quarterly reports, agency appraisal reports, and monthly reports) from four different periods, representing each of Rockefeller's four administrations. Each of the four different report types is found for most, but not all, of the departments.

In general the reports offer an assessment of each department's responsibilities, goals, performance, problems, and needs.

Series 29: William J. Ronan, 1947-1971 (Bulk: 1958-1971), 25 cu. ft. (FA371)

Arrangement: Arranged in six subseries as follows (detailed below):

Scope: The bulk of this series is composed of reports prepared for Governor Rockefeller by various state departments and agencies. Some of these reports duplicate those found in Series 28, Departmental Reports.

Biographical/Historical Sketch: William J. Ronan served as secretary to the Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller from 1959 to 1966 and as head of the Metropolitan Transit Authority in 1965-1966.

Subseries 1, Human Rights Issues, 1959-1964, 1.6 cu. ft.
This series consists primarily of clippings, memoranda, and correspondence on various human rights issues that arose in New York State. It covers all aspects of human and civil rights, from discrimination in housing and employment to education and religion. An entire agency of New York State was devoted to the issue of human rights, the State Commission Against Discrimination and its successor, the State Commission for Human Rights.

Subseries 2, Reference Files, 1945-(1959-1962)-1971, 17.4 cu. ft.
Arrangement: By department or agency

Scope: Consists primarily of annual reports of individual departments and agencies, some from years prior to the beginning of the Rockefeller administration.

Subseries 3, Arthur Levitt Clippings, 1959-1966, 1 cu. ft.
Prior to 1966, Rockefeller's staff maintained a clipping file about Arthur Levitt, a Democrat who was New York State Comptroller from 1955 to 1979. More than 1,300 clippings were sorted, numbered, and organized according to eight categories: Politics (including Levitt's proposals and views), Local Government, Taxation, Financing, Legislature (mostly Levitt's criticism of and comments on the New York State Legislature), Audit and Control, Education, and Miscellaneous. Clippings are further subdivided by year. Some of the clippings were also categorized as "significant," indicating the articles contained something damaging to Levitt, particularly a reversal or modification of a position.

Subseries 4, Legislation, 1964, 2 cu. ft.
Contains a partial selection of legislative proposals submitted to Governor Rockefeller. Included are legislative proposals for specific New York State departments or agencies for 1964, and copies of memoranda that explain Rockefeller's reasons for vetoing or approving a particular piece of legislation.

Subseries 5, Speeches and Statements, 1963, 0.4 cu. ft.
Arrangement: Chronological.
Scope: Contains a portion of the Governor Rockefeller's public statements.

Subseries 6, General Correspondence, 1959-1966, 2.2 cu. ft.
Arrangement: Alphabetical by correspondent.
Scope: Contains general correspondence to and from William Ronan in his capacity as secretary to the Governor, consisting primarily of invitations to various events and information on pertinent issues

Series 33: Speeches, 1958-1973, 116.4 cu. ft. (FA372)

Arrangement: Chronological.

Scope: Contains Rockefeller's reading copy of speeches and transcripts of his remarks at press conferences. Some files contain drafts of speeches. Broad topics include both New York State and national government, politics, and public policy issues. Also included are speeches he made during his campaigns for the Republican presidential nomination in 1960, 1964 and 1968.

Series 34: Diane Van Wie, 1953-1973, 64 cu. ft. (FA373)

Arrangement:

  1. Campaign Correspondence, 1964-1968
  2. Subject Files, 1953-1973
  3. Acknowledgments of Support Gubernatorial/National, 1968-1970
  4. Executive Chamber Staff Memos, 1962-1973
  5. Latin American Trip, 1969-1970
  6. Meetings, Luncheons, and Dinners, 1958-1973
  7. Nelson Rockefeller Schedule, 1958-1970
  8. Position Papers and Policy Proposals
  9. Social Files, 1959-1963
  10. Political Files, 1958-1972
  11. Miscellaneous Files, 1958-1973
  12. Executive Chamber Correspondence, 1970-1973

Biographical/Historical Sketch: Diane Van Wie was a member of Nelson A. Rockefeller's executive staff prior to and during his service as Governor of New York, and Van Wie was one of two assistants to Ann Whitman, executive assistant to the governor, in the Albany office.

Scope: This series document portions of Nelson A. Rockefeller’s public activities from 1953 to 1973.

Subseries 1, Campaign Correspondence, 1964-1968, 6.4 cu. ft.
Arranged alphabetically by state, this subseries contains carbon copies of letters of thanks from Nelson A. Rockefeller to campaign workers, supporters, and well wishers regarding his presidential campaigns in 1964 and 1968.

Subseries 2, Subject Files, 1953-1973, 3.2 cu. ft.
This subseries is arranged alphabetically by topic and contains memos, reports, and correspondence covering such issues as air pollution, Battery Park, budgets, higher education, and transportation.

Subseries 3, Acknowledgments of Support Gubernatorial/National, 1968-1970, 4 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of copies of outgoing correspondence.

Subseries 4, Executive Chamber Staff Memos, 1962-1973, 4.4 cu. ft.
Arranged alphabetically by name, this subseries consists of memos and correspondence dealing with New York State policy issues.

Subseries 5, Latin American Trip, 1969-1970, 0.4 cu. ft.
This small subseries contains material on Nelson Rockefeller's trip to Latin America in 1969 at the request of President Richard M. Nixon. For related material see Record Group 4: Nelson Rockefeller-Personal, Series O: Washington, DC Files, Boxes 98-201.

Subseries 6, Meetings, Luncheons, and Dinners, 1958-1973, 8 cu. ft.
These chronological files of meetings, luncheons, and dinners that Nelson Rockefeller attended or planned to attend include invitation lists, menus, agenda for events, correspondence, and background memos.

Subseries 7, Nelson Rockefeller Schedule, 1958-1970, 4.8 cu. ft.
This subseries, arranged chronologically by month and year, consists of Nelson Rockefeller's daily itineraries, as maintained by Diane Van Wie.

Subseries 8, Position Papers and Policy Proposals, 1959-1964, 6 cu. ft.
This subseries contains background papers on international and national issues and significant policy matters such as arms control, civil defense, foreign aid, and Latin America.

Subseries 9, Social Files, 1959-1963, 2 cu. ft.
This subseries, arranged chronologically, consists of files containing information on breakfasts, luncheons, and receptions with governmental groups and industry leaders that Nelson Rockefeller attended.

Subseries 10, Political Files, 1958-1972, 5.6 cu. ft.
These miscellaneous political files contain information on the Republican Party and Political Data and Program Data Books, which are county books that give detailed political data and statistics for each New York county for the year 1970.

Subseries 11, Miscellaneous Files, 1958-1973, 12 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of miscellaneous subject files containing newspaper clippings, press releases, notes and drafts, statements, and annual messages.

Subseries 12, Executive Chamber Correspondence, 1970-1973, 4.8 cu. ft. This subseries consists of miscellaneous outgoing personal letters, such as letters of support and sympathy. The letters are unsigned carbon copies arranged alphabetically by addressee.

Series 35: Ann C. Whitman, Gubernatorial, 1966-1973, 27.6 cu. ft. (FA374)

Arrangement: Organized in four subseries:

  1. Correspondence, 1967-1970
  1. Kissinger Reports on World Affairs and Countries, 1967-1969
  2. Issues and People, 1966-1973
  3. Campaign 1968

Scope: In her role as Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller's executive assistant, Ann Whitman maintained a large number of his office files. This series covers primarily the period surrounding the 1968 presidential election, when Rockefeller sought the Republican party's presidential nomination.

Series 36: Gene Wyckoff, 1961-1965, 2.2 cu. ft. (FA375)

Arrangement: Two subseries:

  1. Executive Chamber Program Files
  2. Executive Chamber Scripts and Related Materials

Scope: A nearly complete representation of Executive Chamber, a television program written and produced by Gene Wyckoff in late 1964 and 1965. Topics were developed in conjunction with Governor Nelson Rockefeller and his staff. The programs were designed to make clear the governor's position on issues of importance to New York State voters.

Subseries 1, Executive Chamber Program Files, 1961-1965
This subseries covers a variety of issues concerning New York State. It deals with topics that were covered by the broadcasts as well as those considered for future shows. Additional Executive Chamber material may be found in the Jerry Danzig series of the Nelson A. Rockefeller Papers in Record Group 15.

Subseries 2, Executive Chamber Scripts and Related Materials, 1964-1965
This chronologically arranged subseries contains scripts, production notes, and selected correspondence on the majority of the programs that were broadcast.

Series 37: New York Republican State Fundraising reports, 1967-1973, 1.2 cu. ft. (FA376)

Scope: Consists of the general correspondence files of the Office of the Governor. Documents include government reports, internal memoranda, and letters from New York State citizens. Subjects include all aspects of New York State's administration.

Series 38: Office Subject Files, 1959-1973, 515 microfilm reels (FA439)

Arrangement: 4 subseries, by Administration, as follows:

  1. First Administration, 1959-1962
  2. Second Administration, 1963-1966
  3. Third Administration, 1967-1970
  4. Fourth Administration, 1971-1973.

Within each subseries, the material is arranged alphabetically by subject.

Scope: Copies of financial reports that the New York Republican fund raising committees filed with the New York Secretary of State.

Series 39: Films (FA756)

Scope: Contents of these NAR Films have been separated from other archival holdings among the NAR gubernatorial records.

Maps and Flat Files (FA437)

  • Series 10: Nelson A. Rockefeller Gubernatorial records
  • Files pertaining to Series 5: Campaigns and Series 24: Political

Albany Scrapbooks, 1958-1973, 13 microfilm reels (No finding aid)

Scope: A collection of newspaper clippings of the Rockefeller governorship and related New York State governmental and political issues.

Nelson A. Rockefeller Vice-Presidential records

Date: 1958-1977

Bulk: 1974-1977

Extent: 437.6 cubic feet, 63 volumes

  • Series 2: Richard Allison, 1970-1977, 25 cu. ft. (FA377)
  • Series 3: Central Files, 1974-1977, 247.2 cu. ft. (FA378)
  • Series 9: National Commission on Water Quality, 1973-1977, 67.2 cu. ft. (FA379)
  • Series 10: New York Office, 1974-1977, 13 cu. ft. (FA380)
  • Series 12: Joseph E. Persico, 1958-1974, 12 cu. ft. (FA381)
  • Series 13: Press Releases, 1973-1977, 27 cu. ft. (FA382)
  • Series 15: Speeches, 1974-1977, 27.6 cu. ft. (FA383)
  • Series 18: Working papers of the Vice President, 1974-1977, 63 volumes (FA384)
  • Series 19: Foreign Affairs and National Security, 1974-1977, 18.6 cu. ft. (FA385)

Biographical/Historical Sketch: President Gerald R. Ford nominated Nelson A. Rockefeller to fill the vacant vice presidency following the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in August 1974. Rockefeller served as Vice President from December 19, 1974, to January 20, 1977.

Series 2: Richard Allison, 1970-1977, 25. cu. ft. (FA377)

Arrangement: Arranged in twelve subseries, detailed below. Subseries 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, and 12 are arranged chronologically.

Scope: This series documents a portion of Nelson A. Rockefeller's public life from 1974 to 1977. The Richard Allison papers are not his personal papers but are most likely background documentation to Series 18 - Working Papers of the Vice President.

Biographical/Historical Sketch: Richard Allison was an assistant to Nelson A. Rockefeller while Rockefeller was the Vice President of the United States.

Subseries 1: Campaign 1976, 1975-1976, 2 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of correspondence, memos, and newspaper clippings pertaining to the 1976 Presidential election. The bulk of the material deals with the campaign strategy for the election of President Gerald Ford. Notable figures in this subseries are Bob Dole, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and Walter Mondale.

Subseries 2: Presidential Panel on Federal Compensation, 1975-1975, 1 cu. ft.
This subseries contains memos, meetings, and reports of the Presidential Panel on Federal Compensation, which was established by Presidential memorandum to recommend appropriate levels of compensation for federal employees in accordance with the principle of comparability with non-federal employee compensation. The panel was headed by Vice President Nelson Rockefeller from June 1975 to December 1975, and it was terminated upon submission of its final report on December 2, 1975.

Subseries 3: Domestic Council, 1970-1976, 3.2 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of memos, background papers, activity reports, and policy reviews of the Domestic Council. The Domestic Council was formed in 1970 on the recommendation of the President's Advisory Council on Executive Organization. Developed as the domestic counterpart of the National Security Council, its major purpose was to create for the President a centralized, comprehensive policy-formulating group which would work closely with the relevant Cabinet Departments in analyzing and developing policy initiatives on issues such as education, health care, welfare, drug abuse programs, veteran programs, civil rights, and natural resources. The materials in this subseries are background materials for Record Group 26, Series 18 - Working Papers of the Vice President.

Subseries 4: Energy Independence Authority (EIA), 1974-1976, 2.5 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of correspondence, memos, and meetings of the Energy Independence Authority, which was established on October 10, 1975 by an act of Congress. The proposal from President Fordwas to establish an independent government-owned corporation, managed by a five-member board of directors, with authority to invest a total of $100 billion over a seven-year period in energy projects which would help the United States achieve energy independence. The EIA supported projects in nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, and synthetic fuel technology.

Subseries 5: Establishment of Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), 1975-1976. 1.5 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of correspondence, memos, and meetings of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, which Congress established in 1976 with a broad mandate to advise the President and others within the executive office on the impact of science and technology on domestic and international affairs.

Subseries 6: Science Advisory Groups for the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), 1975-1976, 2 cu. ft.
This subseries contains general memos and meetings of the science advisory groups. Two science advisory groups were appointed by President Ford in November 1975. The first group, chaired by Dr. Simon Ramo, was to provide advice on the contributions of technology to economic strength. The other group, chaired by Dr. William Baker, was to provide advice on anticipated advances in science and technology. The groups' priorities were to set up a list of urgent scientific issues. The list included issues in energy, food and nutrition, space, industrial productivity, health and safety regulations, and basic research.

Subseries 7: Administrative and Miscellaneous Files, 1975-1977, 3.6 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of miscellaneous files, including Vice Presidential notes and clippings. It is likely that some of these documents are duplicated in other portions of the Nelson Rockefeller Vice Presidential collection. This subseries is arranged in the original folder order.

Subseries 8: Vice Presidential Miscellaneous Files, 1974-1977, 1.2 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of correspondence and memos generated in the office of Vice President.

Subseries 9:STATUS: Monthly Chartbook of Social and Economic Trends, Weekly Meeting with the President, 1975-1976, 0.1 cu. ft.
The Council of Social Advisors existed to assist the President in preparing social reports, gathering data on social conditions, appraising the effectiveness of existing programs in meeting social needs, and developing social indicators to measure changes in key areas of social importance. Its publicationSTATUSwas issued monthly and was available to the general public. This subseries contains general supplemental material on the advisory council onSTATUS. Additional material onSTATUScan be found in Record Group 26, Series 18 - Working Papers of the Vice President.

Subseries 10: Chronological Files, 1975-1977, 2.8 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of memos from Richard Allison to either Nelson Rockefeller or Central Files on various issues.

Subseries 11: Miscellaneous Clippings, 1975-1977, 0.5 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of magazine and newspaper articles on the Vice Presidency of Nelson Rockefeller.

Subseries 12: Productivity Commission, 1974-1977, 1.2 cu. ft.
This subseries consists of memos and reports of the Productivity Commission, which was established on June 8, 1974 by an act of Congress. Its primary objective was to help increase the productivity of the American economy and to help improve the morale and quality of work of the American worker. The Commission provided technical and consulting assistance to the President and Congress with respect to Government policy affecting productivity and the quality of work.

Series 3: Central Files, 1974-1977, 247.2 cu. ft. (FA378)

Central Files is arranged in 12 subseries as follows:

  1. Name Files, Boxes 70-162.
  2. Subject Files, Boxes 163-201.
  3. Chronological Files, June 26, 1975 - January 19, 1979, Boxes 39-48, 58-60, 68.
  4. Invitations, Boxes 19-22, 49-54, 202-208.
  5. 1976 Presidential Campaign - Schedules and Invitations, Boxes 209-211.
  6. Trip files, Boxes 23, 192-197.
  7. Speeches, Boxes 189-192
  8. Vice President's recommendations for federal appointments, Boxes 57, 61.
  9. Oversized items sent to the Vice President, Boxes 18, 25-38, 55, 56, 69.
  10. Mail Returned by the Secret Service, Box 15.
  11. Control Slips and Control Cards, Boxes 212-215, 218-223.
  12. Correspondence Form Manual, Box 224.

Scope: Contains the general correspondence of the Office of the Vice President during Rockefeller's tenure. It offers partial documentation of his role in the development of national policy; his duties as President of the U.S. Senate; his information-gathering activities on behalf of the White House and executive agencies; and his support of the president's policies. There are also reports and position papers on national issues submitted to the Vice President by individuals both in and outside government. Also documented are Rockefeller's campaign activities on behalf of President Ford and Senator Robert Dole in the 1976 presidential campaign. The bulk of the correspondence consists of letters from U.S. citizens expressing their opinions on issues, inviting the Vice President to speak at events, or asking for assistance with personal problems. The responses to such correspondence were written by the Vice President's staff.

Series 9: National Commission on Water Quality, 1973-1977, 67.2 cu. ft. (FA379)

Arrangement: Material is arranged as received. Most boxes are loosely organized by topic.

Scope: The series includes regional and industry studies of water use and water pollution issues, and models and recommendations for improvements. Topics include conservation, ecological issues and public policy implementation. About half of the volume of this series consists of background material collected by the commission staff; the other half consists of staff correspondence and reports.

Biographical/Historical Sketch: President Richard M. Nixon appointed Rockefeller chairman of this commission, charged with determining the technological, economic, social and environmental aspects of restoring and maintaining the purity of the nation's water supply.

Series 10: New York Office, 1974-1977, 13 cu. ft. (FA380)

Arrangement: Divided in 3 subseries as follows:

  1. Vice Presidential Confirmation Hearings
  2. Office of the Vice President
  3. Sound recordings

Scope: These papers include material prepared for Rockefeller's vice presidential confirmation hearings before the U.S. Congress and a small amount of material from Rockefeller's term as vice president. This series also contains audio material, including cassettes of the proceedings before the House Judiciary Committee and the Senate Rules Committee, as well as reel-to-reel tape recordings of remarks Rockefeller made as vice president.

When President Gerald R. Ford selected Nelson A. Rockefeller to fill the vacant vice presidency on August 20, 1974, Rockefeller's staff began preparing material for the confirmation hearings. Much of the material in this series was gathered from the Rockefeller family archives, then located in Rockefeller Center.

Rockefeller's staff spent most of late August and early September 1974 preparing background data, drafting testimony, and fulfilling requests for information from Congressional committee members. The files that begin this series are the products of those efforts.

Once confirmed and sworn in as Vice President, Rockefeller and his staff began to accumulate files anew. A new set of subject files was created, as well as files concerned with the daily activities of the Vice President. These files were periodically shipped to the family archives in New York for storage.

Access: Some material is restricted.

Subseries 1: Vice Presidential Confirmation Hearings, 1974.
Arrangement: Alphabetical.

Scope: These files were gathered from the Rockefeller family archives in New York to help prepare testimony and position papers on various issues for the hearings. At the end of each day of testimony, the archives staff gathered information that had been requested that day by the committees and sent it Washington.

Subseries 2: Office of the Vice President, 1975-1977.
Arrangement: Alphabetical

Scope: These files were created in Washington and eventually shipped to the Rockefeller family archives in New York. Many of the files contain explanatory memoranda to Dr. Joseph Ernst, the family archivist.

Subseries 3: Sound Recordings, 1974-1977.
Arrangement: Chronological

Scope: A collection of reel-to-reel audiotapes and audiocassettes.

There are two distinct sets of audiocassettes. The first set consists of recordings of the proceedings of the confirmation hearings and the others are cassette recordings of remarks and speeches made by the Vice President.

The reel-to-reel audiotapes are recordings of remarks by the Vice President and other dignitaries.

Series 12: Joseph E. Persico, 1958-1974, 12 cu. ft. (FA381)

Arrangement: Organized in 5 subseries as follows:

  1. New York State Committee to Reelect the President Research Files
  2. Miscellaneous Writings
  3. Pre-Vice Presidential Speeches
  4. Press Releases
  5. Miscellaneous Files

Scope: This series focuses on Joseph E. Persico's service as the chief speech writer for Nelson A. Rockefeller during his two last terms as governor of New York (1967-1973) and as Vice President of the United States. (1974-1977). The collection contains the speeches and press releases that Persico wrote during his official duties; his personal papers and writings are at the New York State Archives in Albany.

Most of this series is made up of speech files. They contain one or more versions of each speech such as drafts, reading copies, transcripts, or press releases. Drafts and reading copies are likely to include Governor Rockefeller's handwritten changes and notations. Some files contain memos, schedules, or background information concerning the event at which the speech was given.

Biographical/Historical Sketch: A native of Gloversville, New York, Persico graduated from the State University of New York at Albany in 1952 with a B.A. in both English and political science. After three years in the U.S. Navy, Persico did graduate work at Columbia University in 1956 and began writing for New York Governor Averill Harriman. In 1959, he became a Foreign Service Officer for the United States Information Agency (USIA) in Brazil, Argentina, and Washington, DC. Between 1963 and 1966, he served as Executive Assistant to New York State Health Commissioner Hollis Ingraham. He joined Rockefeller's staff in 1966 and was his chief speech writer for the remainder of his tenure as governor and throughout his vice presidency.

Subseries 1, New York State Committee to Reelect the President Research Files, 1972 (2 cu. ft).
Arrangement: Alphabetical

Scope: Files contain statistical data and factual information for each state. This information was used by the Committee to Reelect the President research staff based in New York.

Subseries 2, Miscellaneous Writings, 1971-1974(0.5 cubic feet).
Contains miscellaneous speeches and transcribed taped messages that Governor Rockefeller gave at various functions and locations. The speeches also appear in other parts of this collection.

Subseries 3, Pre-Vice Presidential Speeches, 1966-1974(6.4 cubic feet).
Arrangement: Chronological.

Scope: This subseries is composed of speeches written by Joseph Persico for Governor Rockefeller during his third and fourth gubernatorial terms. It also includes speeches written during Rockefeller's first congressional confirmation hearing for U.S. Vice President.

Subseries 4, Press Releases. 1970-1974(1.2 cubic feet).
Arrangement: Chronological.

Scope: These files of press releases also include transcripts of interviews, press conferences, and speeches.

Subseries 5, Miscellaneous Files, 1968-1974(1.2 cubic feet).
Includes an article for the American Academy of Political and Social Science, program papers on major topics such as aging and the economy, Rockefeller's quotations on major issues, and subject indexes for speeches.

Series 13: Press Releases, 1973-1977, 27 cu. ft. (FA382)

Scope: Press releases, notes and background information concerning the statements and activities of Vice President Rockefeller. Also included are trip itineraries and correspondence regarding the logistics of vice presidential travel.

Series 15: Speeches, 1974-1977, 27.6 cu. ft. (FA383)

Scope: Broad topics covered include national politics, government, public policy issues and U.S. foreign relations. Many files include drafts of speeches.

Series 18: Working papers of the Vice President, 1974-1977, 63 volumes (FA384)

Scope: The majority of Rockefeller's actions as Vice President of the United States are documented in this series, which includes schedules, agendas and minutes of meetings, position papers, and memoranda and correspondence generated as part of the Vice President's daily activities.

Volumes 9 through 20 focus on Rockefeller's involvement with President Ford's Domestic Council, while documentation of the Vice President's meetings with President Ford are in Volumes 27 through 31. Volumes 50 through 60 of the series contain a collection of press materials issued by Vice President Rockefeller's office. Included are transcripts of Rockefeller's speeches, television appearances, and press conferences, and statements and press releases issued by the Office of the Vice President. Also noteworthy in the series is Volume 32, which documents the fiscal crisis that affected both New York City and the state.

Series 19: Foreign Affairs and National Security, 1974-1977, 18.6 cu. ft. (FA385)

Arrangement: Primarily organized by broad topic.

Scope: The bulk of this series consists of files kept by Captain Jonathan T. Howe, Assistant to the Vice President for National Security Affairs, who served Nelson A. Rockefeller during his entire vice presidency (December 19, 1974, to January 20, 1977). The contents reflect international relations and national security topics that Capt. Howe monitored closely for the Vice President. He also oversaw Mr. Rockefeller's appointment schedule on these matters and coordinated with Peter Wallison, Counsel to the Vice President, on suggested responses to inquiries involving foreign officials or national security issues.

The topics covered include International Travel, National Security, Meetings with Foreign Dignitaries, Meetings with U.S. Officials, the Commission on the Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy (Murphy Commission), Intelligence, Countries/Regions, and the Commission on CIA Activities Within the United States (alternately Rockefeller or CIA Commission). Additionally, there are several folders of background information on the Operations Coordinating Board, which originate from Mr. Rockefeller's tenure as Special Assistant to President Eisenhower during the mid-1950s. Also significant in this series are monthly folders of Captain Howe's chronological file.

Noticeably absent is documentation of direct communication between the Vice President and President Ford on any of these matters. However, there are numerous memos throughout the series from Secretary of State Henry Kissinger—particularly under International Travel—and National Security Affairs Assistant Brent Scowcroft—particularly under National Security Council Meetings.

Nelson A. Rockefeller Photographs

Date: 1920-1979

Extent: 138 cubic feet (estimated)

  • Series 1008: Nelson A. Rockefeller family (FA454)
  • Series 2: Room 5600, Rockefeller family office, 1920-1979, 18 cu. ft. (FA455)
  • Series 3: Gubernatorial Press Office, 10.8 cu. ft. (FA456)
  • Series 4: Gubernatorial Press Office, 1966, 1969-1973, 13.2 cu. ft. (FA457)
  • Series 5: Gubernatorial, Robert A. (Bob) Wands, 1958-1974, 23 cu. ft. (FA458)
  • Series 6: Vice Presidential, 1973-1976, 19.2 cu. ft. (FA459)
  • Series 7: Unprocessed photographs, 3.6 cu. ft. (FA460)

Memorabilia

Series 1: Nelson A. Rockefeller (Object 1-999) (FA437)

Scope: Contents include medals, certificates, awards, artwork, textiles, plaques, photographs and assorted realia, including campaign materials. Individual memorabilia items have each been assigned a unique object number. The NAR items span objects 1-999.

Access: All inquiries to view memorabilia items require permission from RAC, and advanced notice of up to one week. Individual items may be restricted from scholarly access at the discretion of RAC.



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